Donor-derived hepatitis C in the era of increasing intravenous drug use: A report of the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee

TitleDonor-derived hepatitis C in the era of increasing intravenous drug use: A report of the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2018
AuthorsKaul DR, Tlusty SM, Michaels MG, Limaye AP, Wolfe CR
Volume32
Issue10
Paginatione13370
Date PublishedOct
Abstract

The opioid epidemic has resulted in a potential increase in donors in the testing window period for hepatitis C virus (HCV). We analyzed HCV reports to the Disease Transmission Advisory Committee (DTAC) between 2008 and 2016 to estimate the risk of HCV transmission. In 15 of 95 (16%) reports, at least one recipient developed proven/probable donor-derived HCV resulting in 32 infected recipients. Seven transmissions occurred during the nucleic acid testing (NAT) window period; four occurred during serological window period. The other four transmission occurred due to human error (3) and false-negative serology (1). All seronegative-exposed liver and lung recipients contracted HCV; 18/21 (86%) kidney and 3/4 (75%) heart recipients developed HCV. Four transmitting donors died of intravenous drug overdose, three in 2016 and one in 2012. Among donors with a history of intravenous drug use (IVDU), drug intoxication as a mechanism of death, or increased risk status, and negative screening HCV testing, the risk of transmission to a recipient was about 1 in 1000. The overall risk of transmitting HCV from NAT-negative donors with IVDU is low and consistent with modeling data. This information may be helpful to clinicians counseling potential recipients offered these organs.

Alternate JournalClin Transplant.
Notify Library Reference ID4803